borne

Scientist, displaced Vermonter,
and now...

...a blogger...?

fastcompany:

Tutus, Sparkly Nail Polish, And Half-Pipes: These 6-Year-Olds Will Make You Want To Raise Skateboarding Girls

The three 6-year-old girls who make up the Pink Helmet Posse, profiled by The New York Times, in a short Op-Doc, are equal parts adorable and badass. The film opens with the three friends, Relz, Bella, and Sierra, painting their nails in the middle of a skate park. Next, we see them dropping into a half-pipe and maneuvering around a pile of leaves. The rest of the film follows the insanely talented crew as they practice tricks, fall on their faces, and get scared of bees.

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Want to Fall in Love With a Lens? Try a Prime Lens
Jason D. Little, lightstalking.com
Zoom lenses are everywhere in modern photography — from mobile devices to point and shoot cameras to entry level DSLRs, a zoom lens is pretty much a standard marketing companion. Even many higher end DSLRs typically feature a zoom lens as part of …

Why prime lens? Here’s why:

Want to Fall in Love With a Lens? Try a Prime Lens
Jason D. Little, lightstalking.com

Zoom lenses are everywhere in modern photography — from mobile devices to point and shoot cameras to entry level DSLRs, a zoom lens is pretty much a standard marketing companion. Even many higher end DSLRs typically feature a zoom lens as part of …

Why prime lens? Here’s why:

jaypeakresort:

Mother Nature sure has a way of making up for her fits.

jaypeakresort:

Mother Nature sure has a way of making up for her fits.

What’s the Origin of the Word Dude?
Erin, mentalfloss.com
What’s the Origin of the Word Dude?For some time now, we have known the basic outline of the story of “dude.” The word was first used in the late 1800s as a term of mockery for young men who were overly concerned with keeping up with the latest…

On the origins of “Dude”

What’s the Origin of the Word Dude?
Erin, mentalfloss.com

What’s the Origin of the Word Dude?

For some time now, we have known the basic outline of the story of “dude.” The word was first used in the late 1800s as a term of mockery for young men who were overly concerned with keeping up with the latest…

On the origins of “Dude”

The Cheapest Way to Watch the NFL This Year

Gonna give this a try.  Hoping there’s no catch.  I don’t even have an Xbox. Still working towards #cuttingthecord

The cheapest way to watch a buttload of NFL games this year—all of them live—is with a copy of Madden. You don’t need an Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 or satellite dish to do it, either. Maybe the people behind the deal can’t tell you, but I can: This will work.

The Paper Snowboarder Who Shreds

steve casimiro, adventure-journal.com

Okay, here’s what we’re going to do. You’re going to watch this amazing stop-motion snowboarding video — you’ll gleam as he shreds through the little world — and then I want you to guess how long it took brothers Paul and Stephen Gemignani …

Great authentic sound effects as he shreds

nybg:

Mr Latimer’s amazing bottle garden is not only phenomenal, it also has a rich heritage. The Wardian case, the precursor to today’s terrarium, was invented in 1829 by Dr. Nathaniel Ward. Originally created to provide a habitat for raising moths, the Wardian case soon became a worldwide phenomenon and one of the keys to bringing new plant species home from explorations in far off lands. Wardian cases, bottle gardens, and terrariums are very easy to create, and even easier to care for. Need some tips? We have those. And just a thought: They make a lovely alternative to flower bouquets for your plant-loving sweetie. ~AR

thescienceofreality:

Thriving since 1960, my garden in a bottle: Seedling sealed in its own ecosystem and watered just once in 53 years.

To look at this flourishing mass of plant life you’d think David Latimer was a green-fingered genius. Truth be told, however, his bottle garden – now almost in its 53rd year – hasn’t taken up much of his time. In fact, on the last occasion he watered it Ted Heath was Prime Minister and Richard Nixon was in the White House.

For the last 40 years it has been completely sealed from the outside world. But the indoor variety of spiderworts (or Tradescantia, to give the plant species its scientific Latin name) within has thrived, filling its globular bottle home with healthy foliage.

Yesterday Mr Latimer, 80, said: ‘It’s 6ft from a window so gets a bit of sunlight. It grows towards the light so it gets turned round every so often so it grows evenly. ‘Otherwise, it’s the definition of low-maintenance. I’ve never pruned it, it just seems to have grown to the limits of the bottle.’ 

The bottle garden has created its own miniature ecosystem. Despite being cut off from the outside world, because it is still absorbing light it can photosynthesize  the process by which plants convert sunlight into the energy they need to grow.”

So how does it work exactly?

Bottle gardens work because their sealed space creates an entirely self-sufficient ecosystem in which plants can survive by using photosynthesis to recycle nutrients.

The only external input needed to keep the plant going is light, since this provides it with the energy it needs to create its own food and continue to grow.

Light shining on the leaves of the plant is absorbed by proteins containing chlorophylls (a green pigment).

Some of that light energy is stored in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a molecule that stores energy. The rest is used to remove electrons from the water being absorbed from the soil through the plant’s roots.

These electrons then become ‘free’ - and are used in chemical reactions that convert carbon dioxide into carbohydrates, releasing oxygen.

This photosynthesis process is the opposite of the cellular respiration that occurs in other organisms, including humans, where carbohydrates containing energy react with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, water, and release chemical energy.

But the eco-system also uses cellular respiration to break down decaying material shed by the plant. In this part of the process, bacteria inside the soil of the bottle garden absorbs the plant’s waste oxygen and releasing carbon dioxide which the growing plant can reuse.

And, of course, at night, when there is no sunlight to drive photosynthesis, the plant will also use cellular respiration to keep itself alive by breaking down the stored nutrients.

Because the bottle garden is a closed environment, that means its water cycle is also a self-contained process.

The water in the bottle gets taken up by plants’ roots, is released into the air during transpiration, condenses down into the potting mixture, where the cycle begins again.”

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These things are awesome!